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Garden Reverie Sculpture #9

Garden Reverie Sculpture #9

Sculpting flowers is something I really enjoy doing.  Adding one to my garden lady seemed like a great  thing to do.   (See finished clay pics and promotion and bronze photos) At first I didn’t know how many flowers to add.  Should I have a variety of flowers or just one? Didn’t really want to cover the wavy curls in the front of her hair or cover her ear.  Played around with adding some clay petals to determine what mass I wanted in that area.

 

Playing around with the size of flower to add.

Playing around with the size of flower to add.

Seeing if I should have a group of small flowers.

 

Decided to sculpt one large flower.

Decided to sculpt one large flower.

 

Decided to do a big single flower (nothing too busy looking), one that had a romantic, lacy feel to it.  Because clay shrinks, the flower kept getting smaller, and so I had to add more to the edges in order to get it to be the right size.

 

Will need to back fill clay behind petals so rubber mold will release.

Will need to back fill clay behind petals so rubber mold will release.

 

When making ceramic roses, I can have the petals very thin and dainty. But for bronze, I have to thicken the petals so that the flower will de-mold well.  Maintaining the dainty look can be tricky. I back fill behind the petals with clay, but kept the edges as thin as possible.  Below is the finished rose.

 

Flower is complete.

Flower is complete.

 

Next, I worked on getting her dress finished out with ribbon ties and bow.

Bow has trailing tendrils.

Bow has trailing tendrils.

Closeup of Garden Reverie

 

Wavy hair, flower, and ribbon ties…. that oughta do it!  I love swirly, wavy anything! Lol. :-)

Delicate and fine straps for her dress.

Delicate and fine straps for her dress.

 

If the neckline tie is too fine, the foundry workers might remove too much metal, and the tie would disappear.  I continued to add more clay until it was just thick enough.

Wavy ties are sculpted for her dress.

Continue to build up thickness of dress ties.

Continue to build up thickness of dress ties.

 

In order to work on her bodice area, I had to remove the arm once again.

 

Had to remove arm to work on dress bodice.

Had to remove arm to work on dress bodice.

Wavy and delicate dress bodice.

Wavy and delicate dress bodice.

Belly of sculpture has some fleshyness.

Finshed dress and ribbon ties.

 

Next I’ll work on her chair cushion.

Thank you for your interest in following this sculpture to completion.

 

4 Responses to “Garden Reverie Sculpture #9”

  1. ZooDoc says:

    Beautiful! Romantic realism at its best.

  2. Beautiful! I’d be terrified to remove the arms and legs like you do. I suppose it’s a lot easier on a larger sculpture to do it without damaging the detail. If I’d done that on my little lady sculpture, I think her hands would’ve turned to mush (she may be fired by now – I’ll send you pics! I’ll see her Wednesday).

  3. Mitch mitton says:

    As I said before the flower is just the right touch, and thank you for demo.

  4. Tamara says:

    Thank you everyone. :) Removing the appendages is so useful to really see all angles. Speaking of small sculpture, this one is now 15 1/2″ which includes the base. I never can figure out exactly how much shrinkage will be in casting and I had figured she’d be an inch taller. She looks petite at that size.

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